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What to Do and See in Pula, Croatia

Enjoying all the advantages of its super-strategic location and natural harbor since the Roman times, Pula, the city on the southern end of the Istrian Peninsula in Croatia, is definitely worth the visit!
Sucheta Pradhan Jul 2, 2020
A haven for history buffs, nature lovers, and culture enthusiasts alike, Pula never ceases to impress. Here’s what you can see and do in one of the finest cities of the Istrian Peninsula!
The Arena …
… is one of the most complete ancient Roman amphitheaters in the world.
This 1st century A.D. three-storeyed edifice has arched walls, high towers, underground passages, and water cisterns, and could sit up to 20,000 spectators at a time.
The Forum …
… is Pula’s main city square boasting impressive Roman and Renaissance-style buildings. In summer, concerts and other cultural events are held here, which attract huge crowds.
The Arch of the Sergii …
… is a Roman triumphal arch dating back to about 30 B.C., built to commemorate Sergii family’s participation in the Battle of Actium. It was built as the city’s gate that led up from the naval port.
… is Pula’s Franciscan church belonging to the 1300s. The monastery was built in late-Romanesque architectural style and is one of the main tourist attractions in the city.
Church and Monastery of St. Francis …
Temple of Augustus …
… is a 2,000-year-old edifice built by the Roman ruler Augustus. Currently, it serves as the lapidarium displaying ancient stone artifacts and bronze sculpture found in and around Pula.
Fortress Kaštel …
… is a Venetian fortress from the 1600s. Climb the fortress to see its canons and watchtower. Every July, the Pula International Film Festival is held here!
Pula’s Austro-Hungarian Fortresses …
… mark the set of strong coastal defenses of the city. These are 26 fortresses in all, spread across the city, the most famous ones being Fort Bourguignon and Fort Punta Christo.
Pula Cathedral …
… or more formally the Cathedral of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, was built by the Christians during the persecution.
The interior is quite minimalist in design, but the overall architecture is pretty impressive.
Archaeological Museum of Istria …
… was opened in 1925 and displays artifacts from all over the Istrian Peninsula. The most ancient artifacts date back to the Stone Age and the most recent ones belong to the Byzantine period.
Zerostrasse …
… is the series of subterranean tunnels that run under almost the entire city. Now functioning as galleries for tourists, they were built as war shelters during the 1900s.